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How to
Re-pot your Mini Christmas Tree 

Were you gifted a miniature potted Christmas tree this year?


Miniature Christmas trees are always the cutest thing that can add a spectacular dash of evergreen to your home. Standing 24 inches or smaller, you can find these in garden stores from Thanksgiving through December, and they're often used as host gifts throughout the party season.


That's important to keep in mind as the season winds down — when it's time to repurpose the tree from decoration to an evergreen plant. 


Here are some tips on how to best care for it, so it can be with you for many other Christmas seasons.

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Tip 1

Allow some time for the tree to acclimate

Your little tree has spent most of its life in-store and it needs some time to get used to new exposure and temperature. So don’t re-pot it right after you get it home. Wait until your tree has acclimated to a new environment.

Tip 2

Re-pot in Quality Soil

The tree should use quality soil since many of those miniature Christmas trees have been in their containers for too long and have become root-bound. So you’ll need to help it out with some fresh, new soil.

Tip 3

Stay away from desiccation

Desiccation is the No.1 killer of small trees. You’ll need to regularly irrigate it and a small humidifier could help. 

Tip 4

Keep it cool

Place the miniature potted Christmas tree in a cool area of the house, for example, your window sill. Although there are several types of trees, most require cool temperatures. Make sure there are no sudden changes in temperature.

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Tip 5

Provide Irrigation

Remember to keep the soil slightly moist. If the little tree happens to be rosemary, allow the soil to dry before watering again. Remove the foil wrapping around the pot when watering to prevent drainage issues.

Tip 6

Transplant Outside

Dig a hole and transplant your tree when the holidays are past. Plant the tree where it can get some sun in an area with well-draining soil. Those who live in colder regions may need to wait until spring for the ground to thaw.

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